Press Releases

CRA Statement on WHO Draft Guidelines on Sugar Intake

Corn Refiners Association Statement on World Health Organization Draft Guideline on Sugar Intake

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 5, 2014

CONTACT: David Knowles
(202) 534-3494

WASHINGTON, DC – The Corn Refiners Association applauds all efforts that seek to encourage consumers to maintain a healthy, balanced lifestyle, including the practice of moderation in consuming sweeteners. However, we are concerned with the more extreme direction taken by the World Health Organization’s proposed recommendation on cutting added sugar consumption by half in that it is not based on credible scientific research.

A recent meta-analysis of the gold standard evidence from randomized control trials concluded that limiting sugar consumption does not significantly impact either weight gain or weight loss.  Other recently published research from new randomized controlled trials found no significant nutritional or health related differences in any parameter studied between consuming 8%, 18%, and 30% of daily calories from added sugars.

Rising obesity rates are caused by consumption of too many calories, combined with declining physical activity. The National Institutes of Health has stated that, “People gain weight when they eat more calories than they burn through activity. This imbalance is the greatest contributor to weight gain.”

Finding the right caloric balance is key to a healthy lifestyle.  It is a disservice to consumers to suggest that good health can be achieved by avoiding one particular food or ingredient. We look forward to participating in the comment process and continuing to work towards helping consumers make healthy lifestyle choices.

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The Corn Refiners Association (CRA) is the national trade association representing the corn refining industry of the United States. CRA and its predecessors have served this important segment of American agribusiness since 1913. Corn refiners manufacture sweeteners, ethanol, starch, bioproducts, corn oil and feed products from corn components such as starch, oil, protein and fiber.

Visit us on the Web at www.Corn.org

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